African leaders demand Niger junta to cede power or face sanctions

African leaders on Sunday, gave the junta in Niger one week to relinquish power or face potential forceful intervention, while also imposing financial sanctions on the coup leaders.

ABUJA, Nigeria – On Sunday, African leaders gave the junta in Niger one week to relinquish power or face potential forceful intervention, while also imposing financial sanctions on the coup leaders.

The latest coup in the Sahel region, which saw Niger’s elected president Mohamed Bazoum detained by the military since Wednesday, has raised serious concerns on the continent and in the West.

The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) held an emergency summit in Nigeria and demanded the reinstatement of President Bazoum within a week.

ECOWAS warned that if this demand is not met, it will take “all measures” to restore constitutional order, including the possible use of force.

Washington supported ECOWAS’s stance, with US Secretary of State Antony Blinken welcoming the regional bloc’s efforts to defend constitutional order in Niger.

The US called for the immediate release of President Bazoum and the restoration of the democratically-elected government.

Niger Prime Minister Ouhoumoudou Mahamadou
FILE PHOTO: Nig-er’s Prime Minister Ouhoumoudou Mahamadou addressing the media on national issues.
Niger Coup Consequences

The situation in Niger has drawn global attention, with former colonial ruler France and the European Union suspending security cooperation and financial aid to the country following the coup.

The United States also warned that its assistance to Niamey could be at stake.

Niger’s Prime Minister Ouhoumoudou Mahamadou expressed concern over the imposed sanctions, stating that they would have disastrous economic and social consequences for the country, which is already one of the world’s poorest nations.

The coup marks the third time in as many years that a leader has been ousted in the Sahel region, which is also grappling with a jihadist insurgency.

ECOWAS had previously agreed to create a regional security force to combat jihadist groups and prevent military coups, but details on the force’s deployment and funding remain unclear.

The developments in Niger have also sparked demonstrations, with supporters of the junta rallying outside the national parliament in Niamey.

The protesters expressed solidarity with the military and, in a show of support, moved towards the French embassy, some shouting slogans in support of Russian President Vladimir Putin and expressing opposition to France.

As the situation unfolds, the international community remains watchful of events in Niamey, with concerns about the impact of the coup on regional stability and efforts to combat terrorism in the Sahel.

RosGwen24 News
RosGwen24 News
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